Saturday, October 03, 2015

Looking back, we were stricken motionless by the sight of Kilimanjaro, its twin peaks suspended against a clean blue sky, fresh snow mantling its shoulders. - SE White #QotD

2015.09.27-DSC03225There, above the sky of the horizon, apparently suspended in mid-air halfway to the zenith, hung like delicate bubbles the double snow-cloud peaks of Kilimanjaro. Between them and the earth we could apparently see clear sky. It was in reality, of course, the blue-heat haze that rarely leaves these torrid plains. I have seen many mountains in all parts of the world, but none as fantastically insubstantial ; as wonderfully lofty; as gracefully able to yield, before clouds and storms and sunrise glows, all the space in infinity they could possibly use, and yet to tower above them serene in an upper space of its own. Nearly every morning of our journey to come we enjoyed this wonderful vision for an hour or so. Then the mists closed in. The rest of the day showed us a grayish sky along the western horizon, with apparently nothing behind it. (p. 226)

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Looking back, we were stricken motionless by the sight of Kilimanjaro, its twin peaks suspended against a clean blue sky, fresh snow mantling its shoulders. (pp. 251-52)

From African Camp Fires (1914) by Stewart E. White

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