Thursday, May 28, 2015

The unseen wonders and complexity of growing plants, with their peculiarities, mechanism, and Nature's provision for multiplying in the thick growth of the African jungle, are marvellous. #QotD

2015.05.25-DSC01265
Kakum National Park
I had a chance to visit the Kakum National Forest in Ghana, quite spectacular!
Vegetable life in tropical zones is suspended, or sleeping, for a very much shorter period than occurs in colder climates. Bulbous and tuberous plants hibernate in spells of a little over a month, reappearing three times in the course of twelve months. Maize (or mealies) reproduce crops three times within the year. This rapid evolution of nature is presumably brought about by the tropical heat, rain, electricity, and a superabundance of carbonic acid in the air, together with the action of long spells of sunlight, which tend to a rapid production of plant food. Vegetable life in the tropics does not take the long winter rest that it enjoys in colder climates, where its life germs retire into protected shelters, and slumber away the period of frosts and snows. The dead seasons in the Gold Coast Colony occur between the rains. January and March months are the principal rest months for recuperation, but most trees take their rest  after they have shed their fruits and leaves in September, October, and November. The rains that take place at the end of November, and the tornado downpours in December add temporary activity to vegetable growth. The general growing season for cereals, however, starts after the dry and hot month of March.
2015.05.25-DSC01256 The colder atmosphere existing during the period of clouded sun and heavy rains extending from May to the end of June, enables some species of vegetation to recuperate, while it has a contrary effect on others by awakening and increasing their activity after their short sleep in the early months of the year.
The unseen wonders and complexity of growing plants, with their peculiarities, mechanism, and Nature's provision for multiplying in the thick growth of the African jungle, are marvellous. It is one continuous struggle for existence and preservation of the fittest. No better example comes under notice in this struggle of plant life to live than the race for light observed in the various kinds of trees in the densely packed forest.
Gold Coast palaver; life on the Gold Coast by Louis Patrick Bowler (1911), pp. 74-75

No comments: