Friday, January 24, 2014

@BryanAlexander on The Hope and the Hype of MOOCs at #ALAMW14 from @OCLC

MOOCs
The Hope and the Hype of MOOCs

Speaker: Bryan Alexander, Senior Fellow of NITLE; Skip Prichard (OCLC, moderator)
Panel: Anya Kamentz (Fast Company); Ray Schroeder (University of Illinois, Springfield); Audrey Watters (Hack Education); Cathy De Rosa (OCLC)
Performed a live poll of audience and webcaster audience (using text and website); most (small majority) said MOOCs were more hope than hype; most also never participated in a MOOC.

Bryan Alexander
Gave a quick overview and history of MOOCs; began roughly in 2008 in Canada, these are the cMOOCs; later, around 2010, the xMOOCs were formed at the large universities (Standford, MIT). 2012 is the start of the MOOC boom as they started to turn into a business (Udacity); NYTimes declared 2013 the year of the MOOC and now 2014 is the year of great disillusion.

  • cMOOCs are more ground up; more open; rarely licensed; remixable. Still trying to figure that out; “freemium” not proven yet.
  • What is the business model for MOOCs?
  • CP Snow's “Two Cultures” divide is heavily played out in MOOCs; lots of work and acceptance in science, but less so in the humanities.
  • cMOOCs are more ground up; more open; rarely licensed; remixable. Still trying to figure that out; “freemium” not proven yet. Coursera, Udemy; edX; Khan Academy; Uudactiy) are still looking for a model; many turning to corporate education (easier money) and many of them may crash.
  • MOOCs are likely to follow the Gartner Hype Cycle curve: excitement, Trough of Disillusionment, Slope of Enlightenment; Plateau of Productivity
  • MOOCs may become “Just part of life” or become MOCs (turned soley towards for profit); lastly, we may see a xMOOC / cMOOC fusion where the connective nature of cMOOCs is co-opted to make xMOOCs more interactive.



3 comments:

Bryan Alexander said...

Thank you for the good notes, Mark.

Are you exploring MOOCs in your library work?

Martin Kalfatovic said...

Bryan, we're still monitoring the MOOC space and seeing where Smithsonian Libraries can provide (open) content to MOOCs created by educators worldwide; also, from a wider Smithsonian, if there are MOOCs offered from the Institution, we would participate.

Bryan Alexander said...

The more open content from your treasure trove, the better!